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STS104-704-78
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Spacecraft nadir point: 20.8° N, 160.1° W

Photo center point: 20.0° N, 155.5° W

Nadir to Photo Center: East

Spacecraft Altitude: 207 nautical miles (383km)
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Image Caption: Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, Hawaii
The Big Island of Hawaii is almost completely enshrouded by clouds at the lower coastal elevations while the tall volcanoes of Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa are visible above the clouds in this east-looking view. The Hawaiian Islands began to form over 30 million years ago as the Pacific Plate moved northwest over a stationary "hot spot". Formation of the Big Island of Hawaii began over 1 million years ago. Mauna Kea, now an extinct shield volcano (upper left of center of the image), rises to 13796 feet (4260 meters). It is the world's tallest mountain from its base on the ocean floor to its summit and measures 31796 feet (9698 meters). Mauna Loa (center of the image) with its numerous dark looking lava flows descending from its summit in all directions, is the world's tallest active volcano at 13677 feet (4170 meters). A shield volcano, Mauna Loa is the most massive mountain on earth measuring 10000 cubic miles (41700 cubic km), more that 100 times the size of Mount Rainier in Washington state. Mauna Loa has erupted 37 times since 1832, the last in 1984.