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STS049-92-71
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Spacecraft nadir point: 25.0° N, 9.9° E

Photo center point: 19.0° N, 7.0° E

Nadir to Photo Center: South

Spacecraft Altitude: 194 nautical miles (359km)
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Image Caption: STS049-92-071 - Saharan Duststorm, Algeria-Niger Border

This south-looking, late-afternoon view shows one of the best examples in the Shuttle photo data base of a duststorm. A series of gust fronts, caused by dissipating thunderstorms, have picked up dust along the outflow boundaries. Small cumulus clouds have formed over the most vigorously ascending parts of the dust front, enhancing the visual effect of the front. The storm is moving roughly NNW, at right angles to the most typical path for duststorms in this part of the Sahara (shown by lines of sand on the desert surface in the foreground). Storms such as these can move out into the Atlantic, bringing dust even as far as the Americas on some occasions. Taken May 13, 1992, at 16:43:51 GMT, with a Hasselblad camera, 100-mm lens, and color film.



A series of gust fronts caused by disipating thunderstorms have picked up dust along the outflow boundries and produced this dust storm in the Sahara Desert along the Algeria/Niger border (25.0N, 10.0E). Small cumulus clouds have formed over the most vigorously ascending parts of the dust front, enhancing the visual effect. Storms such as this can move out into the Atlantic, bringing dust even as far as the Americas and beyond.