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ISS006-E-47517
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Spacecraft nadir point: 44.6° S, 152.4° E

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Nadir to Photo Center: West

Spacecraft Altitude: 215 nautical miles (398km)
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3032 pixels 2004 pixels No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site Download Image
540 pixels 334 pixels NASA's Earth Observatory web site Download Image
1024 pixels 677 pixels No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site Download Image
540 pixels 334 pixels Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site Download Image
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Image Caption: If Iris, the goddess of the rainbow, had a sister she would be the goddess of Aurora. Glowing green ripples form arcs that constantly transform their shape into new glowing diaphanous forms. There is nothing static about auroras. They are always moving, always changing, and like snowflakes, each display is different from the last. Sometimes, there is a faint touch of red layered above the green. There are bright spots within the arcs that come and go, and transform into upward directed rays topped by feathery red structures. Sometimes there will be six or more rays, sometimes none at all.

In a new feature, Auroras Dancing in the Night, International Space Station Science Officer Don Pettit provides a firsthand account of these spectacular red and green light shows.

Links:
Don Pettit's Space Chronicles
Saturday Morning Science movie