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ISS004-E-8972
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Spacecraft nadir point: 17.7° N, 62.9° W

Photo center point: 17.0° N, 62.0° W

Nadir to Photo Center: Southeast

Spacecraft Altitude: 213 nautical miles (394km)
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540 pixels 722 pixels Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site Download Image
540 pixels 706 pixels Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site Download Image
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Image Caption: International Space Station crew members are regularly alerted to dynamic events on the Earth's surface. On request from scientists on the ground, the ISS crew observed and recorded activity from the summit of Soufriere Hills on March 20, 2002. This image provides a context view of the island. When the image was taken, the eastern side of the summit region experienced continued lava growth, and reports posted on the Smithsonian Institution's Weekly Volcanic Activity Report indicate that "large (50-70 m high), fast-growing, spines developed on the dome's summit. These spines periodically collapsed, producing pyroclastic flows down the volcano's east flank that sometimes reached the Tar River fan. Small ash clouds produced from these events reached roughly 1 km above the volcano and drifted westward over Plymouth and Richmond Hill. Ash predominately fell into the sea. Sulfur dioxide emission rates remained high. Theodolite measurements of the dome taken on March 20 yielded a dome height of 1,039 m."

Other photographs by astronauts of Montserrat have been posted on the Earth Observatory: digital photograph number ISS002-E-9309, taken on July 9, 2001; and a recolored and reprojected version of the same image.



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