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STS045-152-179
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Spacecraft nadir point: 19.5° N, 60.6° E

Photo center point: 19.0° N, 59.0° E

Nadir to Photo Center: West

Spacecraft Altitude: 160 nautical miles (296km)
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Image Caption:
STS045-152-179: Water Circulation Along the Coast of Oman In
this view of sunglint along the coast of Oman, coastal water
flowing northeast from the Arabian Sea is seen to curl counter-
clockwise, forming an eddy, as it rounds the tip of Oman at RaUs
al Hadd and flows north into the Gulf of Oman. An oil slick, ap-
pearing in the center of the sunglint pattern as a bright line on
the water surface, highlights the dimensions of the eddy. Nearly
50% of the oil transported worldwide passes through the Gulf of
Oman, en route from the Persian Gulf, and numerous ship wakes can
be seen in this picture. Oil slicks frequently appear in Space
Shuttle photographs of this area and have helped to highlight
many circulation features. In November 1990, the crew of STS- 38
photographed a similar eddy, also highlighted by oil slicks and
ship wakes, along this same stretch of the Omani coast.

The photograph was taken on the 30th of March (orbit 95), using
the 5-inch format Linhof camera, from an altitude of 160 n. mi.
with the Shuttle located at 21.8! N and 59.0! E.




In this sunglint view of the Arabian Seacoast of Oman (19.0N, 59.0E) an oil slick is highlighted on the water's surface by sunglint lighting conditions. Nearly 50 percent of the oil transported worldwide passes through the Gulf of Oman, en route from the Persian Gulf and numerous ship wakes can be seen in this view. The oil slick, rounding the tip of Cape Ras Al Hadd, has formed a counterclockwise bright spiral indicating the local ocean currents.