STS028-151-216

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Photo center point: 43.0° N, 70.5° W

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Image Caption:
In this southwest-looking view of the Gulf of Maine, the sun's
glint pattern is positioned directly over the eastern tip of
Georges Bank, a shallow sand bank that is located east of Cape
Cod (center left portion of the photo) and forms the eastern
boundary of the Gulf of Maine. The cold waters atop Georges Bank
appear smooth within the sunglint pattern because colder water
tends to stabilize the atmospheric boundary layer, thus suppress-
ing the formation of small-scale waves. A complex pattern of
internal waves is seen propagating across the Gulf of Maine, hav-
ing been generated at Georges Bank by the turbulence resulting
from strong tidal currents. The very existence of the internal
waves indicates that the waters overlying the deeper areas of the
Gulf are stratified, as is typical of summer conditions. The
photograph (S28-151-216) was taken on 9 August 1989 from a alti-
tude of 160 n.mi. (296 km) using a 90 mm lens and CVIS film.

S28-151-216 In this southwest-looking view of the Gulf of Maine, the
sun's glint pattern is positioned directly over the eastern tip of
Georges Bank, a shallow sand bank that is located east of Cape Cod
(center left portion of the photo) and forms the eastern boundary of
the Gulf of Maine. The cold waters atop Georges Bank appear smooth
within the sunglint pattern because colder water tends to stabilize
the atmospheric boundary layer, thus suppressing the formation of
small-scale waves. A complex pattern of internal waves is seen
propagating across the Gulf of Maine, having been generated at Georges
Bank by the turbulence resulting from strong tidal currents. The very
existence of the internal waves indicates that the waters overlying
the deeper areas of the Gulf are stratified, as is typical of summer
conditions. The photograph was taken on 9 August 1989 from a altitude
of 160 n.mi. (296 km) using a 90 mm lens and CVIS film.