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ISS006-E-18372
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516 x 387 pixels 2000 x 1368 pixels 2000 x 1312 pixels 639 x 437 pixels

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Spacecraft nadir point: 46.5° N, 55.5° W

Photo center point: 50.5° N, 69.5° W

Nadir to Photo Center: West

Spacecraft Altitude: 206 nautical miles (382km)
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516 pixels 387 pixels Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site Download Image
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Image Caption: What do auroras look like from space? From the ground, auroras dance high above clouds, frequently causing spectacular displays. The International Space Station (ISS) orbits just at the same height as many auroras, though. Therefore, sometimes it flies over them, but also sometimes it flies right through. The auroral electron and proton streams are too thin to be a danger to the ISS, just as clouds pose little danger to airplanes. ISS Science Officer Don Pettit captured a green aurora, pictured above in a digitally sharpened image. From orbit, Dr. Pettit reports, changing auroras can appear to crawl around like giant green amoebas. Far below, on planet Earth, the Manicouagan Impact Crater can be seen in northern Canada.