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  Image: Geographic Location Direction Photo #: ISS015-E-16913 Date: Jul. 2007
Geographic Region: RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Feature: SHIVELUCH VOLCANO, PLUMES

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  ISS015-E-16913 (10 July 2007) --- Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka, Russian Far East is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 15 crewmember on the International Space Station. Shiveluch is one of the biggest and most active of a line of volcanoes along the spine of the Kamchatka peninsula in easternmost Russia. In turn the volcanoes and peninsula are part of the tectonically active "Ring of Fire" that almost surrounds the Pacific Ocean, denoted by active volcanoes and frequent earthquakes. Shiveluch occupies the point where the northeast-trending Kamchatka volcanic line intersects the northwest-trending Aleutian volcanic line. Junctions such as this are typically points of intense volcanic activity. According to scientists, the summit rocks of Shiveluch have been dated at approximately 65,000 years old. Lava layers on the sides of the volcano reveal at least 60 major eruptions in the last 10,000 years, making it the most active volcano in the 2,200 kilometer distance that includes the Kamchatka peninsula and the Kuril island chain. Shiveluch rises from almost sea level to well above 3,200 miles (summit altitude 3,283 miles) and is often capped with snow. In this summer image however, the full volcano is visible, actively erupting ash and steam in late June or early July, 2007. The dull brown plume extending from the north of the volcano summit is most likely a combination of ash and steam (top). The two larger white plumes near the summit are dominantly steam, a common adjunct to eruptions, as rain and melted snow percolate down to the hot interior of the volcano. The sides of the volcano show many eroded stream channels. The south slope also reveals a long sloping apron of collapsed material, or pyroclastic flows. Such debris flows have repeatedly slid down and covered the south side of the volcano during major eruptions when the summit lava domes explode and collapse (this occurred during major eruptions in 1854 and 1964). Regrowth of the forest on the south slope (note the contrast with the eastern slope) has been foiled by the combined effects of continued volcanic activity, instability of the debris flows and the short growing season.




Shiveluch Volcano, Russia's Far East:

Shiveluch is one of the biggest and most active of a line of volcanoes that follow the spine of the Kamchatka Peninsula in easternmost Russia. The volcanoes and peninsula are part of the tectonically active “Ring of Fire,” a zone of active volcanoes and frequent earthquakes that nearly surrounds the Pacific Ocean.

Shiveluch rises from almost sea level to a summit altitude of 3,283 meters (10,770 feet), and it is often capped with snow. In this image, from July 10, 2007, however, the full volcano is visible. The dull brown plume extending from the north of the volcano summit is most likely a combination of ash and steam. The two larger white plumes near the summit are dominantly steam, which often forms as rain and melted snow percolate down to the hot interior of the volcano.

The sides of the volcano show many eroded stream channels. The south slope also reveals a long, sloping apron of collapsed material or pyroclastic flows (hot clouds of ash, rock fragments, and gas). Such debris flows have repeatedly slid down and covered the south side of the volcano when the summit lava domes exploded and collapsed. This type of event occurred during major eruptions in 1854 and 1964. Regrowth of forest on the south slope has been foiled by the combined effects of continued volcanic activity, instability of the debris flows and the short growing season.

Shiveluch sits at the intersection of the Kamchatka volcanic line, which runs northeast, and the Aleutian volcanic line, which runs northwest. Junctions such as this are typically points of intense volcanic activity. Lava layers on the sides of the volcano reveal at least 60 major eruptions in the last 10,000 years, making it the most active volcano in the 2,200-kilometer distance that includes the Kamchatka peninsula and the Kuril Island chain.
 
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Images: All Available Images Low-Resolution 232k
Mission: ISS015  
Roll - Frame: E - 16913
Geographical Name: RUSSIAN FEDERATION  
Features: SHIVELUCH VOLCANO, PLUMES  
Center Lat x Lon: 56.6N x 161.4E
Film Exposure:   N=Normal exposure, U=Under exposed, O=Over exposed, F=out of Focus
Percentage of Cloud Cover-CLDP: 10
 
Camera: N1
 
Camera Tilt: HO   LO=Low Oblique, HO=High Oblique, NV=Near Vertical
Camera Focal Length: 800  
 
Nadir to Photo Center Direction: N   The direction from the nadir to the center point, N=North, S=South, E=East, W=West
Stereo?:   Y=Yes there is an adjacent picture of the same area, N=No there isn't
Orbit Number: 1452  
 
Date: 20070710   YYYYMMDD
Time: 221824   GMT HHMMSS
Nadir Lat: 51.5N  
Latitude of suborbital point of spacecraft
Nadir Lon: 160.5E  
Longitude of suborbital point of spacecraft
Sun Azimuth: 112   Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point
Space Craft Altitude: 174   nautical miles
Sun Elevation: 44   Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point
Land Views: FOREST, PENINSULA, VOLCANO  
Water Views:  
Atmosphere Views: PLUME  
Man Made Views:  
City Views:  
Photo is not associated with any sequences


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