Return to Earth From Space Home
Earth from Space logo Image Information Earth from Space logo

Display a Screen Layout for Printing

IMAGE: gray corner       IMAGE: gray corner
  Image: Geographic Location Direction Photo #: ISS013-E-54243 Date: Jul. 2006
Geographic Region: USA-OREGON
Feature: CRATER LAKE, WIZARD ISLAND

Ordering information for space photography
 
IMAGE: gray corner     IMAGE: gray corner

Image: gray corner     Image: gray corner
  View Low-Resolution Image  
  ISS013-E-54243 (19 July 2006) --- Crater Lake, Oregon is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember on the International Space Station. Crater Lake is formed from the caldera (collapsed magma chamber) of a former volcano known as Mount Mazama. Part of the Cascades volcanic chain, Mount Mazama is situated between the Three Sisters volcanoes to the north and Mount Shasta to the south. While considered a dormant volcano, Crater Lake is part of the United States Geological Survey Cascades Volcano Observatory seismic monitoring network. The dark blue water coloration is typical of the 592 meter (1943 feet) deep Crater Lake; light blue-green areas to the southeast of Wizard Island (along the southern crater rim) most probably correspond to particulates either on or just below the water surface. A light dusting of snow fills the summit cone of Wizard Island. Some of the older lava flows in the area are associated with Mount Scott to the east-southeast of the Lake. Water is lost only by evaporation and seepage, and is only replenished by rainwater and snowmelt from the surrounding crater walls. These processes help maintain minimal sediment input into the lake and exceptional water clarity. The Crater Lake ecosystem is of particular interest to ecologists because of its isolation from the regional landscape, and its overall pristine quality is important to recreational users of Crater Lake National Park (447,240 visitors in 2005). The United States National Park Service maintains programs to monitor changes (both natural and human impacts) to Crater Lake.




Crater Lake, Oregon:
Crater Lake is formed from the caldera of Mount Mazama. Part of the Cascades volcanic chain, Mount Mazama sits between the Three Sisters volcanoes to the north and Mount Shasta to the south. The catastrophic eruption of Mount Mazama that occurred approximately 7,700 years ago destroyed the volcano while simultaneously forming the basin for Crater Lake. Eruptive activity continued in the region for perhaps a few hundred years after the major eruption. Evidence of this activity lingers in volcanic rocks, lava flows, and domes beneath the lake surface; the small cone of Wizard Island is the only visible portion of these younger rocks. Although considered a dormant volcano, Crater Lake is part of the United States Geological Survey Cascades Volcano Observatory seismic monitoring network.

According to the U.S. Geological Survey, Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States, with an average depth of 350 meters (1,148 feet). Water is lost only by evaporation and seepage, and is only replenished by rainwater and snowmelt from the surrounding crater walls. These processes help maintain minimal sediment input into the lake and exceptional water clarity. The dark blue color of the water shown in this image is typical of Crater Lake; light blue-green areas to the southeast of Wizard Island (along the southern crater rim) probably correspond to particulates—perhaps dust— either on or just below the water surface.

A light dusting of snow fills the summit cone of Wizard Island. Some of the older lava flows in the area are associated with Mount Scott to the east-southeast of the lake. The Crater Lake ecosystem is of particular interest to ecologists because of its isolation from the regional landscape, and its overall pristine quality is important to recreational users of Crater Lake National Park. The United States National Park Service maintains programs to monitor changes—both natural and human—to Crater Lake.

 
Image: gray corner     Image: gray corner

Images: All Available Images Low-Resolution 299k
Mission: ISS013  
Roll - Frame: E - 54243
Geographical Name: USA-OREGON  
Features: CRATER LAKE, WIZARD ISLAND  
Center Lat x Lon: 43.0N x 122W
Film Exposure:   N=Normal exposure, U=Under exposed, O=Over exposed, F=out of Focus
Percentage of Cloud Cover-CLDP: 10
 
Camera: E4
 
Camera Tilt: 16   LO=Low Oblique, HO=High Oblique, NV=Near Vertical
Camera Focal Length: 400  
 
Nadir to Photo Center Direction: E   The direction from the nadir to the center point, N=North, S=South, E=East, W=West
Stereo?:   Y=Yes there is an adjacent picture of the same area, N=No there isn't
Orbit Number: 3829  
 
Date: 20060719   YYYYMMDD
Time: 165257   GMT HHMMSS
Nadir Lat: 43.3N  
Latitude of suborbital point of spacecraft
Nadir Lon: 122.8W  
Longitude of suborbital point of spacecraft
Sun Azimuth: 101   Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point
Space Craft Altitude: 177   nautical miles
Sun Elevation: 42   Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point
Land Views: BASIN, CALDERA, CRATER, ISLAND, VOLCANO  
Water Views: LAKE, SEDIMENT  
Atmosphere Views:  
Man Made Views:  
City Views:  
Photo is not associated with any sequences


NASA Human
Space Flight
NASA
Home Page
JSC
Home Page
NASA
Image eXchange
JSC Digital
Image Collection
Earth Sciences &
Image Analysis