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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

Astronaut Photography of Earth - Display Record

ISS026-E-25437

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS026-E-25437.JPG 93327640437 No No
View ISS026-E-25437.JPG 261698540359 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS026-E-25437.JPG 7085611000664 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS026-E-25437.JPG 156233442882929 No No

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Electronic Image Data

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Identification

Mission: ISS026 Roll: E Frame: 25437 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS026
Country or Geographic Name: MEXICO
Features: PICO DE ORIZABA VOLCANO, LAHAR DEPOSITS, SIERRA NEGRA
Center Point: Latitude: 19.0 Longitude: -97.3 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: 8
Camera Focal Length: 400mm
Camera: N2: Nikon D2Xs
Film: 4288E : 4288 x 2848 pixel CMOS sensor, RGBG imager color filter.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20110210 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 140316 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: 19.2, Longitude: -96.9 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: Southwest
Sun Azimuth: 111 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 190 nautical miles (352 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 14 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 2097

Captions

Pico de Orizaba, Mexico

The snow and ice-clad peak of Pico de Orizaba (also known as Citlaltepetl) boasts a summit elevation of 5675 meters (18619 feet) above sea level, making it the highest peak in Mexico and North America’s highest volcano. It is also one of three volcanic peaks in Mexico—together with Popocatepetl and Iztaccihuatl-that retain summit glaciers. Pico de Orizaba is part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt that extends roughly east-west across Mexico. The last recorded eruption took place in 1846; while the volcano is considered dormant at present, geologists continue to investigate the potential hazards associated with a renewal of activity.

Shadows accentuate several features of the Pico de Orizaba stratovolcano visible in this astronaut photograph from the International Space Station. The 300 meter deep summit crater is clearly visible against surrounding ice and snow cover at image center. Several lava flows extend down the flanks of the volcano, made readily visible by prominent cooling ridges along their sides known as flow levees - one of the most clearly visible examples is located on the southwest flank of the cone.
The extinct Sierra Negra volcano to the southwest has a summit elevation of 4640 meters (15,223 feet) above sea level; while not as lofty as Pico de Orizaba, it is also one of Mexico’s highest peaks.


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