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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

Astronaut Photography of Earth - Display Record

ISS025-E-17440

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS025-E-17440.JPG 62088640438 No No
View ISS025-E-17440.JPG 191063540359 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS025-E-17440.JPG 5287891000664 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS025-E-17440.JPG 69749342562913 No No

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Electronic Image Data

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Identification

Mission: ISS025 Roll: E Frame: 17440 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS025
Country or Geographic Name: RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Features: LAKE KRONOTSKOE, KRONOTSKY VOLCANO, KRASHENINNIKOV VOLCANO, SCHMIDT VOLCANO
Center Point: Latitude: 54.8 Longitude: 160.5 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: High Oblique
Camera Focal Length: 800mm
Camera: N5: Nikon D3S
Film: 4256E : 4256 x 2832 pixel CMOS sensor, 36.0mm x 23.9mm, total pixels: 12.87 million, Nikon FX format.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20101119 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 230214 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: 48.7, Longitude: 172.8 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: West
Sun Azimuth: 162 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 188 nautical miles (348 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 20 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 797

Captions

Kamchatka Volcanoes

This astronaut photograph of snow-covered volcanoes on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula illustrates one of the unique attributes of the International Space Station— the ability to view landscapes at an angle, rather than the straight-down view typical of many satellite-based sensors. This oblique view, together with shadows cast by the volcanoes and mountains, provides perspective about the topography of the region.

Kronotsky and Kizimen stratovolcanoes are distinguished by their symmetrical cones. Kizimen last erupted in 1928, while Kronotsky—one of the largest on the peninsula—last erupted in 1923.

Schmidt Volcano, to the north of Kronotsky, has the morphology of a shield volcano and is not known to have erupted since humans have been keeping records.

To the south (left) is Krasheninnikov, comprised of overlapping stratovolcanoes that formed within an earlier caldera. Krasheninnikov may have last erupted in 1550. Two summit craters are clearly visible.

Lake Kronotsky is Kamchatka’s largest lake. It formed when lava flows from Kronotsky Volcano dammed the Listvenichnaya River.

The Kamchatka Peninsula lies along the so-called Pacific "Ring of Fire." The ring is characterized by active volcanoes and frequent earthquakes associated with the many active subduction and transform boundary zones around the Pacific tectonic plate. There are 114 volcanoes on the Kamchatka Peninsula that have erupted during the Holocene Epoch (approximately 12,000 years ago to the present).

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