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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

Astronaut Photography of Earth - Display Record

ISS022-E-8285

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS022-E-8285.JPG 72971640437 No No
View ISS022-E-8285.JPG 230953540400 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS022-E-8285.JPG 6551321000740 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS022-E-8285.JPG 96353142882929 No No

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Electronic Image Data

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Identification

Mission: ISS022 Roll: E Frame: 8285 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS022
Country or Geographic Name: CHILE
Features: LLULLAILLACO VOL.
Center Point: Latitude: -24.7 Longitude: -68.5 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: 23
Camera Focal Length: 800mm
Camera: N2: Nikon D2Xs
Film: 4288E : 4288 x 2848 pixel CMOS sensor, RGBG imager color filter.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20091209 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 205702 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: -25.2, Longitude: -67.3 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: West
Sun Azimuth: 256 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 188 nautical miles (348 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 28 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 3363

Captions

Llullaillaco Volcano, Argentina-Chile Border

The summit of South America’s Llullaillaco Volcano has an elevation of 6,739 meters (22,110 feet) above sea level, making it the highest historically active volcano in the world. The current stratovolcano—a cone-shaped volcano built from successive layers of thick lava flows and eruption products like ash and rock fragments—is built on top of an older stratovolcano. The last explosive eruption of the volcano, based on historical records, occurred in 1877.

This detailed astronaut photograph of Llullaillaco illustrates an interesting volcanic feature known as a coulée (image top right). Coulées are formed from highly viscous, thick lavas that flow onto a steep surface. As they flow slowly downwards, the top of the flow cools and forms a series of parallel ridges oriented at 90 degrees to the direction of flow (somewhat similar in appearance to the pleats of an accordion). The sides of the flow can also cool faster than the center, leading to the formation of wall-like structures known as flow levees (image center). Llullaillaco is also a well-known archaeological site; the mummified remains of three Inca children, ritually sacrificed 500 years ago, were discovered on the summit in 1999.


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