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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

Astronaut Photography of Earth - Display Record

ISS022-E-5403

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS022-E-5403.JPG 55389640437 No No
View ISS022-E-5403.JPG 210931540359 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS022-E-5403.JPG 6112421000664 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS022-E-5403.JPG 108718442882929 No No

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Electronic Image Data

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Identification

Mission: ISS022 Roll: E Frame: 5403 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS022
Country or Geographic Name: FRANCE
Features: GIENS PEN., HYERES, AIRPORT, COAST
Center Point: Latitude: 43.1 Longitude: 6.2 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: High Oblique
Camera Focal Length: 400mm
Camera: N2: Nikon D2Xs
Film: 4288E : 4288 x 2848 pixel CMOS sensor, RGBG imager color filter.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20091202 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 084556 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: 40.5, Longitude: 2.1 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: Northeast
Sun Azimuth: 138 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 179 nautical miles (332 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 16 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 3245

Captions

Giens Peninsula, France

This detailed astronaut photograph shows the Giens Peninsula, located along the Mediterranean coastline of France. The peninsula is part of the Côte d’Azur, also known as the French Riviera. The coastal region is bounded by the Rhône River to the west, the Rhône Alps to the north, and the Italian border to the east. The peninsula extends southwards from the city of Hyères to the resort community of Giens.

The Giens Peninsula is formed from two tombolos. A tombolo is a ridge of beach material (typically sand), built by wave action, that connects an island to the mainland. Tombolos, like many coastal features, typically change dramatically over geologic time due to fluctuating sediment supply, coastal currents, sea levels and storm events. The tombolos of the Giens Peninsula have been modified by human activities, as well, including sand dune removal, construction of roadways, and replacement of the original sand by other materials. The long-term survival of these tombolos will be determined by the effects of these changes on the natural coastal processes, with potential sea level rise presenting an additional threat.

In addition to Giens, three other urban areas are visible in this image: Carqueiranne, Hyères, and La Londe-les-Maures. The urban areas are recognizable by both light pink rooftops and grey street grids. These colors contrast with green to brown vegetated areas, including agricultural fields between Hyères and La Londe-les-Maures and more natural vegetation (dark green) on hills between Hyères and Carqueiranne. Small white dots and streaks in the Mediterranean Sea are yachts and other recreational boats.


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