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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

Astronaut Photography of Earth - Display Record

ISS022-E-26137

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS022-E-26137.JPG 87442640439 No No
View ISS022-E-26137.JPG 264552540347 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS022-E-26137.JPG 8230911000642 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS022-E-26137.JPG 311305560484147 No No

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Identification

Mission: ISS022 Roll: E Frame: 26137 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS022
Country or Geographic Name: USA-ARIZONA
Features: OPEN PIT COPPER MINES, GREEN VALLEY, SAHUARITA
Center Point: Latitude: 31.9 Longitude: -111.1 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: 33
Camera Focal Length: 440mm
Camera: N4: Nikon D3X
Film: 6048E : 6048 x 4032 pixel CMOS sensor, 35.9mm x 24.0mm, total pixels: 25.72 million, Nikon FX format.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20100114 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 213747 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: 33.2, Longitude: -109.6 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: Southwest
Sun Azimuth: 214 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 182 nautical miles (337 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 28 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 3932

Captions

Open Pit Mines, Southern Arizona

Copper is a good conductor of electricity and heat, and it is a vital element of virtually all modern electronic devices. Arizona is the United States’ largest source of copper, primarily mined from a type of ore body known as porphyry copper deposits. The most common approach to extracting metal-bearing ore from a porphyry copper deposit is by open-pit mining, although such mines also typically include some underground activities.

This astronaut photograph illustrates three open-pit mines located west-northwest of the town of Green Valley, Arizona. While the mines appear to be close to each other, each exploits a separate porphyry copper deposit. A porphyry copper deposit forms when crystal-rich magma moves upwards through pre-existing rock layers. As the magma cools and crystallizes, it forms an igneous rock with large crystals embedded in a fine-grained matrix, known as porphyry. Hot fluids circulate through the magma and surrounding rocks via fractures, depositing copper-bearing and other minerals in characteristic spatial patterns that signal the nature of the ore body to a geologist.

The mine pits are recognizable by the concentric lines of benches cut into the pit sides. The benches allow equipment and personnel access to the fresh ore (gray) exposed at the bottom of the excavation. Water may also pool at the bottom of inactive pits, such as in the Twin Buttes Mine at image upper right (black areas). The open pit areas are surrounded by an array of sculpted tailings ponds and mine dump areas; these receive mine waste rock for storage and later leaching for further recovery of metals. The green color of the water in the tailings pond at image right is likely due to the presence of leached metals.

The Asarco-Mission complex (image left) is an active producer of copper and molybdenum (important in making steel and other metal alloys), processing approximately 53,700 tons of ore per day (as of 2008). The Twin Buttes Mine (image top right), also a producer of copper and molybdenum, was closed in 1994 but was recently purchased by a new owner (Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold) and may reopen. The Sierrita Mine at image lower right (also owned by Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold) produces copper, molybdenum, and the rare metal rhenium. Rhenium is used to make high-temperature alloys for jet engine parts and in high-octane, lead-free gasoline. This mine can process over 115,000 tons of ore per day (as of 2007).


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