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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

Astronaut Photography of Earth - Display Record

ISS017-E-6820

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS017-E-6820.JPG 94647640436 No No
View ISS017-E-6820.JPG 251609540372 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS017-E-6820.JPG 71952630322065 No No
View ISS017-E-6820.JPG 7455101000689 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site

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Electronic Image Data

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Identification

Mission: ISS017 Roll: E Frame: 6820 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS017
Country or Geographic Name: CANARY ISLANDS
Features: ISLA DE LA PALMA, CINDER CONES
Center Point: Latitude: 28.6 Longitude: -17.9 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: 6
Camera Focal Length: 400mm
Camera: E4: Kodak DCS760C Electronic Still Camera
Film: 3060E : 3060 x 2036 pixel CCD, RGBG array.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20080513 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 090753 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: 28.7, Longitude: -18.2 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: East
Sun Azimuth: 86 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 181 nautical miles (335 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 34 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 2303

Captions

Isla de la Palma, Canary Islands

The Canary Islands, a group of volcanic islands, lie just off the west coast of Morocco in the Atlantic Ocean; at the northwest end of the chain of islands is Isla de la Palma (pictured here). The island started forming as a submarine volcano approximately 3-4 million years ago. Subaerial (above the water surface) volcanic activity and island formation began around 2 million years ago. Most geologists believe the Canary Islands formed over the remnants of an old “hotspot” in the mantle, or mantle plume. The residual hotspot melting produced the magma that resulted in the Canary Island volcanoes. While there is little evidence to support the current existence of a mantle plume, volcanic activity is still taking place– the most recent lava flows on Isla de Palma were erupted in 1971. In addition to volcanic hazards, the Canary Islands are also subject to occasional dust storms originating in the Sahara Desert.

This astronaut photograph highlights volcanic landforms on the southern portion of Isla de Palma. The elongated, 1949-meter high Cumbre Vieja volcanic center is characterized by numerous cinder cones, craters, and gray lava flows that punctuate the green vegetated hillslopes. To the north, the cities of El Paso and Los Llanos de Aridanes nestle against collapsed fragments of the Caldera Taburiente (image left), formed by massive slope failure of an older volcanic center to the north. Tourism is a major component of the local economy, but the high mountains and clear air of Isla de la Palma are also attractive to astronomers – several large observatories (not shown) are located along the northern edge of the Caldera Taburiente.


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