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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

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ISS015-E-5977

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS015-E-5977.JPG 84836639435 No No
View ISS015-E-5977.JPG 305563540384 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS015-E-5977.JPG 9207441000712 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS015-E-5977.JPG 146079630322064 No No

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Electronic Image Data

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Identification

Mission: ISS015 Roll: E Frame: 5977 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS015
Country or Geographic Name: NETHERLANDS
Features: DEN HELDER, MARSDIEP, TEXEL
Center Point: Latitude: 53.0 Longitude: 4.8 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: 43
Camera Focal Length: 800mm
Camera: E4: Kodak DCS760C Electronic Still Camera
Film: 3060E : 3060 x 2036 pixel CCD, RGBG array.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20070501 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 135408 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: 51.8, Longitude: 7.3 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: West
Sun Azimuth: 232 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 176 nautical miles (326 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 43 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 341

Captions

ISS015-E-05977 (1 May 2007) --- Den Helder, Netherlands is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 15 crewmember on the International Space Station. The city and harbor of Den Helder in the northern Netherlands has been the home port of the Dutch Royal Navy for over 175 years. Its favorable location provides access to the North Sea, and has made it an important commercial shipping port in addition to its strategic role. Bright red agricultural fields to the south of Den Helder indicate another noteworthy aspect of the region--commercial farming of tulips and hyacinth. This image is an oblique view--the camera is oriented at an angle relative to "straight down"--of the Den Helder region taken from the space station, which was located to the southeast, near Dulmen, Germany (approximately 225 kilometers away in terms of ground distance) when the image was acquired. In addition to the manmade structures of the Den Helder urban area (reddish gray to gray street grids) and dockyards to the east of the city, several striking geomorphic features are visible. The extensive gray mudflats, with their prominent branching pattern (top right), indicate that this image was acquired at low tide, and suggest the general low elevation of the region. Parallel wave patterns along the mudflats and in the Marsdiep strait are formed as water interacts with the sea bottom between Den Helder and Texel Island during tidal flow. Some ship wakes are also visible. According to scientists, the bright white-gray triangular region at the southern tip of Texel Island (bottom center) is a dune field, consisting mainly of eolian (windborne) sands deposited during the last Ice Age. Subsequent sea level rise and shoreline processes have mobilized and re-deposited these sands into their current configuration -- including a new dune field island to the southwest of Texel (bottom center).




Den Helder, Netherlands:
The city and harbor of Den Helder in the northern Netherlands has been the home port of the Dutch Royal Navy for over 175 years. The location provides access to the North Sea, which has made it an important commercial and strategic port. Bright red agricultural fields to the south of Den Helder indicate another noteworthy aspect of the region—commercial farming of tulips and hyacinth. This astronaut photograph is an oblique view (an angled, not a “straight down”view) of the Den Helder region taken from the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS was located to the southeast, near Dülmen, Germany, when the image was acquired, about 225 kilometers (140 miles) away in terms of ground distance.

In addition to the urban structures of the Den Helder area (reddish-gray to gray street grids) and dockyards to the east of the city, several striking natural features are visible. The prominent branching pattern of the extensive gray mudflats (image bottom right) indicate that this image was acquired at low tide, and show the generally low elevation of the region. Parallel wave patterns along the mudflats and in the Marsdiep Strait are formed as water interacts with the sea bottom between Den Helder and Texel Island during tidal flow. (Some ship wakes are also visible.) The bright, white-gray triangular region at the southern tip of Texel Island (image upper left) is a dune field, consisting mainly of eolian (wind-borne) sands deposited during the last ice age. Subsequent sea level rise and shoreline processes have shifted these sands into their current configuration, which includes a new dune field island to the southwest of Texel.


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