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ISS014-E-19807

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS014-E-19807.JPG 103798639435 No No
View ISS014-E-19807.JPG 330467540356 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS014-E-19807.JPG 9822581000659 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS014-E-19807.JPG 144296630322064 No No

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Identification

Mission: ISS014 Roll: E Frame: 19807 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS014
Country or Geographic Name: CANADA-Q
Features: MONTEREGION HILLS, AGR., GRANBY
Center Point: Latitude: 45.5 Longitude: -73.0 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: 10
Camera Focal Length: 180mm
Camera: E4: Kodak DCS760C Electronic Still Camera
Film: 3060E : 3060 x 2036 pixel CCD, RGBG array.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20070418 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 215537 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: 45.4, Longitude: -72.5 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: West
Sun Azimuth: 268 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 171 nautical miles (317 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 17 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 141

Captions

ISS014-E-19807 (18 April 2007) --- Monteregian Hills, Quebec, Canada are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 14 crewmember on the International Space Station. This view captures two striking patterns, pointed out by NASA scientists who study the shuttle and station photography. The circular features are the central members of the Monteregian Hills located to the east of Montreal--Mont St. Hilaire, Rougemont, and Mont Yamaska. The rectangular pattern records the intensive agricultural land use of the fertile lowlands in southern Quebec. The Monteregian Hills are an isolated series of roughly east-west trending plutons--masses of igneous rock that crystallized below the land surface--located near Montreal. According to the scientists, magmas forming the Hills were intruded into pre-existing sedimentary rocks during the Cretaceous Era (roughly 123-125 million years ago). Over time, the sedimentary rock has eroded away, leaving the more resistant igneous rock of the plutons exposed as the Monteregian Hills in the surrounding flat St. Lawrence Plains. Rocks of these three plutons record a transition from silica-poor magmas (little to no minerals such as quartz or feldspar) to silica-rich magmas (abundant quartz and feldspar) along the line of the Hills. Snow cover on the three mountains provides additional contrast with surrounding tan to brown fallow agricultural fields. The city of Granby, Quebec is visible at left. In addition to their interesting geology, the Monteregian Hills also serve as important woodland habitat "islands" in the greater Montreal urban area.




Monteregian Hills, Quebec, Canada:
This astronaut photograph of the area to the east of Montreal, Canada, captures two striking patterns. The circular features are the central members of a group of unusual rock formations known as the Monteregian Hills: Mont St. Hilaire, Rougemont, and Mont Yamaska. The rectangular pattern blanketing the landscape in the background reveals the intensive agriculture in the fertile lowlands in southern Quebec.

The Monteregian Hills are an isolated series of roughly east-west trending plutons, masses of igneous (formed from magma) rock that crystallized below the land surface. The magmas that form the Hills intruded into pre-existing sedimentary rocks roughly 125 to 123 million years ago, during the Cretaceous Era. Over time, the sedimentary rock has eroded away, leaving the more resistant igneous rock of the plutons exposed as the Monteregian Hills, standing over the surrounding, flat St. Lawrence Plains.

Snow cover on the three mountains provides contrast with surrounding fallow agricultural fields, which are shades of brown and tan. A bright white circle nestled on top of Mont St. Hillaire is snow-covered Lac Hertel (Hertel Lake). In addition to their interesting geology, the Monteregian Hills also serve as important woodland habitat “islands” in the greater Montreal urban area. Several small town and cities are visible in the image, appearing as purplish-gray patches. The largest in the scene is the city of Beloeil, straddling the Richelieu River west of Mont St. Hillaire.

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