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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

Astronaut Photography of Earth - Display Record

ISS014-E-11872

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS014-E-11872.JPG 36871639435 No No
View ISS014-E-11872.JPG 160228540396 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS014-E-11872.JPG 4315691000734 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS014-E-11872.JPG 55072630322064 No No

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Electronic Image Data

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Identification

Mission: ISS014 Roll: E Frame: 11872 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS014
Country or Geographic Name: NORTHERN MARIANA IS.
Features: PAGAN, VOLCANOS, ASH PLUME
Center Point: Latitude: 18.0 Longitude: 146.0 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: 19
Camera Focal Length: 180mm
Camera: E4: Kodak DCS760C Electronic Still Camera
Film: 3060E : 3060 x 2036 pixel CCD, RGBG array.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 25 (11-25)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20070111 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 065721 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: 18.1, Longitude: 145.0 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: East
Sun Azimuth: 242 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 180 nautical miles (333 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 13 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 2599

Captions

Pagan Island, Northern Mariana Islands:
The Mariana Islands are part a volcanic island arc—surface volcanoes formed from magma generated as one tectonic plate overrides another. In the case of the Mariana Islands, the Pacific Plate is being pulled, or subducted, beneath the Philippine Plate along the famously deep Mariana Trench, which is more than 11 kilometers (nearly 7 miles) below sea level. Pagan Island (image right) is made up of two volcanoes connected by a narrow isthmus of land. The volcanoes are stratovolcanoes, which are tall, typically cone-shaped structures formed by layers of dense, crystallized lava and less-dense ash and pumice. Mount Pagan, the larger of the two volcanoes, forms the northeastern portion of the island and has been the most active historically.

The most recent major eruption took place in 1981, but since then numerous steam- and ash-producing events have been observed at the volcano—the latest reported one occurring between December 5–8, 2006. This astronaut photograph records volcanic activity on January 11, 2007, that produced a thin plume that extended westwards away from Mount Pagan. The plume was most probably steam, possibly with minor ash content. The island is sparsely populated, and it is monitored for volcanic activity by the United States Geological Survey and the Commonwealth of the Mariana Islands.

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