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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

Astronaut Photography of Earth - Display Record

ISS013-E-67242

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS013-E-67242.JPG 53490639435 No No
View ISS013-E-67242.JPG 244941357540 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS013-E-67242.JPG 7102796611000 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS013-E-67242.JPG 105286630322064 No No

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Electronic Image Data

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Identification

Mission: ISS013 Roll: E Frame: 67242 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS013
Country or Geographic Name: NEW ZEALAND-SI
Features: BANKS PEN., CHRISTCHURCH, SED.
Center Point: Latitude: -43.5 Longitude: 173.0 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: High Oblique
Camera Focal Length: 180mm
Camera: E4: Kodak DCS760C Electronic Still Camera
Film: 3060E : 3060 x 2036 pixel CCD, RGBG array.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20060815 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 222346 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: -47.5, Longitude: 178.7 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: Northwest
Sun Azimuth: 28 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 185 nautical miles (343 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 24 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 258

Captions

250,000 Earth Photographs from the International Space Station

The crew of Expedition 13 recently passed a major milestone: as of late August 2006, more than one quarter of a million images of Earth had been taken from the International Space Station. The rate at which Expedition 13 has been photographing the Earth has been record-setting, as they passed the 200,000th image mark less than two months before. The 250,000th image is an oblique view (the photograph was taken from a side angle) of the city of Christchurch, New Zealand. The oblique view provides a sense of perspective and accents topography, in contrast to nadir (directly downwards) views, such as this image of Christchurch acquired by the Landsat 7 satellite in 2001.

Snow highlights the peaks of the Banks Peninsula to the southeast of the city. The peninsula has a radically different landscape compared to the adjoining, flat Canterbury Plains, where Christchurch (gray patch to the north) is located. The Banks Peninsula is formed from the overlapping cones of the extinct Lyttelton and Akaroa volcanoes. Subsequent erosion of the cones formed the heavily dissected terrain visible in the image, and sea level rise led to the creation of several harbors around the Peninsula. Erosion continues unabated today, as evidenced by the apron of greenish blue, sediment-laden waters surrounding the Banks Peninsula.

Other interesting features in the image include the braided Waimakariri River to the north-northwest of the city, and the greenish brown waters of Lake Ellesmere at image left. The coloration of the water is due both to its shallow depth (1.4 meters on average) and its high concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus, which fertilizes the growth of large amounts of green algae.

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