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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

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ISS013-E-54243

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS013-E-54243.JPG 80459639435 No No
View ISS013-E-54243.JPG 306514417540 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS013-E-54243.JPG 8649791000773 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS013-E-54243.JPG 129627130322064 No No

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Identification

Mission: ISS013 Roll: E Frame: 54243 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS013
Country or Geographic Name: USA-OREGON
Features: CRATER LAKE, WIZARD ISLAND
Center Point: Latitude: 43.0 Longitude: -122.0 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: 16
Camera Focal Length: 400mm
Camera: E4: Kodak DCS760C Electronic Still Camera
Film: 3060E : 3060 x 2036 pixel CCD, RGBG array.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20060719 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 165257 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: 43.3, Longitude: -122.8 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: East
Sun Azimuth: 101 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 177 nautical miles (328 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 42 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 3829

Captions

ISS013-E-54243 (19 July 2006) --- Crater Lake, Oregon is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember on the International Space Station. Crater Lake is formed from the caldera (collapsed magma chamber) of a former volcano known as Mount Mazama. Part of the Cascades volcanic chain, Mount Mazama is situated between the Three Sisters volcanoes to the north and Mount Shasta to the south. While considered a dormant volcano, Crater Lake is part of the United States Geological Survey Cascades Volcano Observatory seismic monitoring network. The dark blue water coloration is typical of the 592 meter (1943 feet) deep Crater Lake; light blue-green areas to the southeast of Wizard Island (along the southern crater rim) most probably correspond to particulates either on or just below the water surface. A light dusting of snow fills the summit cone of Wizard Island. Some of the older lava flows in the area are associated with Mount Scott to the east-southeast of the Lake. Water is lost only by evaporation and seepage, and is only replenished by rainwater and snowmelt from the surrounding crater walls. These processes help maintain minimal sediment input into the lake and exceptional water clarity. The Crater Lake ecosystem is of particular interest to ecologists because of its isolation from the regional landscape, and its overall pristine quality is important to recreational users of Crater Lake National Park (447,240 visitors in 2005). The United States National Park Service maintains programs to monitor changes (both natural and human impacts) to Crater Lake.




Crater Lake, Oregon:
Crater Lake is formed from the caldera of Mount Mazama. Part of the Cascades volcanic chain, Mount Mazama sits between the Three Sisters volcanoes to the north and Mount Shasta to the south. The catastrophic eruption of Mount Mazama that occurred approximately 7,700 years ago destroyed the volcano while simultaneously forming the basin for Crater Lake. Eruptive activity continued in the region for perhaps a few hundred years after the major eruption. Evidence of this activity lingers in volcanic rocks, lava flows, and domes beneath the lake surface; the small cone of Wizard Island is the only visible portion of these younger rocks. Although considered a dormant volcano, Crater Lake is part of the United States Geological Survey Cascades Volcano Observatory seismic monitoring network.

According to the U.S. Geological Survey, Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States, with an average depth of 350 meters (1,148 feet). Water is lost only by evaporation and seepage, and is only replenished by rainwater and snowmelt from the surrounding crater walls. These processes help maintain minimal sediment input into the lake and exceptional water clarity. The dark blue color of the water shown in this image is typical of Crater Lake; light blue-green areas to the southeast of Wizard Island (along the southern crater rim) probably correspond to particulates—perhaps dust— either on or just below the water surface.

A light dusting of snow fills the summit cone of Wizard Island. Some of the older lava flows in the area are associated with Mount Scott to the east-southeast of the lake. The Crater Lake ecosystem is of particular interest to ecologists because of its isolation from the regional landscape, and its overall pristine quality is important to recreational users of Crater Lake National Park. The United States National Park Service maintains programs to monitor changes—both natural and human—to Crater Lake.



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