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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

Astronaut Photography of Earth - Display Record

ISS013-E-14843

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS013-E-14843.JPG 67806639435 No No
View ISS013-E-14843.JPG 7263115201008 No No Not enhancedConverted to JPEG from a raw image
View ISS013-E-14843.JPG 284656540377 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS013-E-14843.JPG 8173411000699 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site

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Electronic Image Data

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Identification

Mission: ISS013 Roll: E Frame: 14843 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS013
Country or Geographic Name: USA-MICHIGAN
Features: ROGERS CITY, LIMESTONE QUARRY
Center Point: Latitude: 45.4 Longitude: -83.8 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: 37
Camera Focal Length: 800mm
Camera: E4: Kodak DCS760C Electronic Still Camera
Film: 3060E : 3060 x 2036 pixel CCD, RGBG array.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20060506 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 211724 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: 47.6, Longitude: -84.4 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: South
Sun Azimuth: 256 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 183 nautical miles (339 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 35 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 2665

Captions

Calcite Quarry, Michigan

While the Great Lakes region of North America is well known for its importance to shipping between the United States, Canada, and the Atlantic Ocean, it is also the location of an impressive structure in the continent’s bedrock: the Michigan Basin. Formed during the Paleozoic Era (approximately 540-250 million years ago) the Basin looks much like a large bullseye defined by the arrangement of exposed rock layers that all tilt inwards, forming a huge bowl-shaped structure. While this “bowl” is not readily apparent from the ground, detailed mapping of the rock units on a regional scale revealed the structure to geologists. The outer layers of the Basin include thick deposits of carbonates—rocks containing carbon and oxygen, such as limestone—deposited over millions of years when a shallow sea covered the region.

These carbonate rocks are mined throughout the Great Lakes region using large open-pit mines. The largest carbonate mine in the world, Calcite Quarry, appears in this astronaut photograph. The mine has been active for over 85 years. The worked area (grey region in image center) measures approximately 7 kilometers long by 4 kilometers wide, and it is crossed by several access roads (white). The rocks are processed to create crushed aggregate, building stone, soil enhancers, lime, additives to steel, and a host of other products. Calcite Quarry ships between 7 and 10.5 million tons of material each year, thanks to the quarry’s location on the shores of Lake Huron. Nearby Rogers City was once a typical mining company town, but over time it has expanded its economic base as a summer retreat for sailing and tourism.


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