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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

Astronaut Photography of Earth - Display Record

ISS012-E-18779

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS012-E-18779.JPG 67484639435 No No
View ISS012-E-18779.JPG 7191715201008 No No Not enhancedConverted to JPEG from a raw image
View ISS012-E-18779.JPG 269060540357 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS012-E-18779.JPG 7293851000661 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site

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Electronic Image Data

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Identification

Mission: ISS012 Roll: E Frame: 18779 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS012
Country or Geographic Name: IRAN
Features: LINEAR MTS., DASH-E-LUT SALARS
Center Point: Latitude: 33.5 Longitude: 57.0 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: High Oblique
Camera Focal Length: 180mm
Camera: E4: Kodak DCS760C Electronic Still Camera
Film: 3060E : 3060 x 2036 pixel CCD, RGBG array.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 50 (26-50)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20060228 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 132150 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: 27.5, Longitude: 51.8 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: Northeast
Sun Azimuth: 253 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 186 nautical miles (344 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 15 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 1604

Captions

Winter in the Dasht-e-Lut Desert, Eastern Iran

An International Space Station crew member took this striking photograph one evening in late February. The image takes advantage of the Sun’s low angle to reveal linear geological structures of the Iranian mountain range bordering the western edge of the basin known as Dasht-e-Lut. The range rises 1,818 meters (6,000 feet) above sea level and lies 750 kilometers (466 miles) north of the Persian Gulf. The convoluted appearance results from erosion of folded and faulted rocks—softer rocks erode away quickly, leaving more resistant rock to form linear ridges that are perpendicular to the direction of compression. While not a major oil-producing region like the Zagros Fold Belt to the southwest, the mountains of east-central Iran contain economically important deposits of copper and other metals.

Little vegetation can be seen from space in the arid interior basin of the Dasht-e-Lut. Iran is climatically part of the Afro-Asian belt of deserts that stretch from the Cape Verde islands off West Africa all the way to Mongolia near Beijing, China. The patchy, elongated, light-colored feature in the foreground (parallel to the mountain range) is the northernmost of the Dasht dry lakes that stretch southward 300 kilometers (186 miles). In near-tropical deserts, elevated areas capture most precipitation. Agricultural fields that depend on this precipitation appear as small dark patches in this image. They are located downslope, near the margin of the lake’s dry, salty soils.


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