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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

Astronaut Photography of Earth - Display Record

ISS012-E-13692

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS012-E-13692.JPG 4213015201008 No No Not enhancedConverted to JPEG from a raw image
View ISS012-E-13692.JPG 56950639435 No No
View ISS012-E-13692.JPG 168523540322 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS012-E-13692.JPG 4420551000596 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site

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Electronic Image Data

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Identification

Mission: ISS012 Roll: E Frame: 13692 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS012
Country or Geographic Name: USA-LOUISIANA
Features: BASTROP, SMOKE PLUME, GLINT
Center Point: Latitude: 32.9 Longitude: -92.0 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: 39
Camera Focal Length: 400mm
Camera: E4: Kodak DCS760C Electronic Still Camera
Film: 3060E : 3060 x 2036 pixel CCD, RGBG array.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20060102 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 222403 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: 30.8, Longitude: -93.4 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: Northeast
Sun Azimuth: 235 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 185 nautical miles (343 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 10 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 712

Captions

Forest Fire, Ouachita National Wildlife Refuge, LA

Dry conditions and high winds have lead to numerous recent fire outbreaks throughout much of the southwestern and south-central USA. Drought conditions have persisted in the region for months, leading to a build-up of fire fuels, including dried grasses, shrubs, and trees. The combination of high amounts of dry fuel and frequent high winds has stoked small fires into widespread brush fires.

This astronaut photograph captures a 25-kilometer long smoke plume from a fire in the Upper Ouachita National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Louisiana. The fire started at approximately 1:00 p.m. on January 2, 2006, and this image was acquired approximately three and a half hours later as the International Space Station passed over the Texas-Louisiana border, to the southwest of the scene. The long extent of the plume reflects the strong westerly winds that drove the fire eastwards and damaged an estimated 200-300 acres of the wildlife refuge. The striking illumination of the plume is caused by a very low sun angle (the angle between the horizon and the Sun at the point on the ground directly below the Space Station). Although the plume is well illuminated, the low sun angle results in low illumination of other scene features, such as agricultural fields adjacent to the refuge.


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