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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

Astronaut Photography of Earth - Display Record

ISS011-E-12401

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS011-E-12401.JPG 58293640428 No No
View ISS011-E-12401.JPG 136179539336 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS011-E-12401.JPG 13767230081960 No No Not enhancedConverted to JPEG from a raw image
View ISS011-E-12401.JPG 4682371000647 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site

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Electronic Image Data

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Identification

Mission: ISS011 Roll: E Frame: 12401 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS011
Country or Geographic Name: RUSSIAN FEDERATION
Features: G. FINLAND, L. LADOGA, GLINT
Center Point: Latitude: 60.0 Longitude: 30.7 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: High Oblique
Camera Focal Length: 400mm
Camera:
Film:

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20050710 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 181346 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: 50.1, Longitude: 47.9 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: Northwest
Sun Azimuth: 323 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 187 nautical miles (346 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: -10 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 1939

Captions

St. Petersburg and the Gulf of Finland

This strongly oblique (from the side) view shows the Gulf of Finland and Lake Ladoga in the late afternoon. At this time of day, sunglint—the reflection of sunlight into the camera lens—distinguishes the bodies of water from their surroundings. The image was taken from the International Space Station when the craft orbited north of the Caspian Sea, approximately 2,500 kilometers (1600 miles) to the southeast on the Russia-Kazakhstan border. Lakes in Finland in the middle of the view are 3,000 kilometers (1900 miles) from the camera.

The Neva River appears in sunglint, connecting Lake Ladoga to the gulf. Czar Peter the Great constructed St. Petersburg, starting in 1703, on the Neva River Delta. He established this city as his capital and window into Europe via the Baltic Sea. (Although not visible, St. Petersburg—the home town of Sergei Krikalev, Space Station commander when this picture was taken—lies on the Neva River delta.) In this view, taken with a powerful 400-millimeter lens, sunglint even reveals the causeways to Kotlin Island in the gulf—including some of the details of their construction. Oblique views reveal marked layers of gray haze generated by air pollution (top image, top of view), a common sight over Western Europe. Pollution also renders the bright glint areas a coppery color.



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