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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

Astronaut Photography of Earth - Display Record

ISS011-E-11428

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS011-E-11428.JPG 140620639435 No No
View ISS011-E-11428.JPG 573620540680 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS011-E-11428.JPG 159802310001260 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS011-E-11428.JPG 190301930322008 No No Not enhancedConverted to JPEG from a raw image

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Electronic Image Data

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Identification

Mission: ISS011 Roll: E Frame: 11428 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS011
Country or Geographic Name: USA-WASHINGTON
Features: MT. RAINIER, SNOW, GL., FOREST
Center Point: Latitude: 46.8 Longitude: -121.7 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: High Oblique
Camera Focal Length: 400mm
Camera: E4: Kodak DCS760C Electronic Still Camera
Film: 3060E : 3060 x 2036 pixel CCD, RGBG array.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20050731 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 173835 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: 49.3, Longitude: -115.2 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: West
Sun Azimuth: 129 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 187 nautical miles (346 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 50 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 2269

Captions

Mt. Rainier, Washington

A clear summer day over Washington state provided the International Space Station crew the chance to observe Mt. Rainier—a volcano that overlooks the Seattle metropolitan area and the 2.5 million people who live there. In addition to its presence on the Seattle skyline, Mt. Rainier also looms large among volcanoes in the United States.

It is the highest volcano in the Cascades, with an elevation of 4,392 meters (14,411 feet) above sea level at the summit of the Columbia Crest. Emmons Glacier on the eastern slope is the largest glacier in the lower 48 states. Nisqually Glacier has been actively monitored for more than a century, making it the longest-monitored glacier in the United States. Rainier is an active volcano located next to a large population center, supports several large glaciers, and presents the largest volcanic hazard in the country. While the last recorded eruption of Rainier occurred in 1840, the volcano is continuously monitored by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Cascade Volcano Observatory.

This view shows off Rainier’s spectacular landforms, including details of the approximately 400-meter-diameter (1,280-foot) summit crater and the glaciers that radiate from the summit. The large debris fields that fill the valleys draining the glaciers comprise one of Rainier’s geohazards: potential landslides and debris flows triggered by earthquakes, eruptions, magma-water interactions, or sudden snow or ice melting. Also visible are roads leading to Paradise, an area on the mountain’'s south side that provides ready access to trails and spectacular vistas of the glaciers.


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