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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

Astronaut Photography of Earth - Display Record

ISS010-E-9366

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS010-E-9366.JPG 108857639435 No No
View ISS010-E-9366.JPG 311126540374 Yes Yes Earth From Space collection
View ISS010-E-9366.JPG 9750611000693 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS010-E-9366.JPG 143751830322064 No No

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Electronic Image Data

Camera Files >> No sound file available.

Identification

Mission: ISS010 Roll: E Frame: 9366 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS010
Country or Geographic Name: USA-NEW YORK
Features: LAKE ONTARIO, SYRACUSE, SNOW
Center Point: Latitude: 43.0 Longitude: -77.0 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: 34
Camera Focal Length: 50mm
Camera: E4: Kodak DCS760C Electronic Still Camera
Film: 3060E : 3060 x 2036 pixel CCD, RGBG array.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20041204 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 150114 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: 43.5, Longitude: -75.0 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: West
Sun Azimuth: 153 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 187 nautical miles (346 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 20 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 2509

Captions

New York's Finger Lakes

A late fall snowstorm frosted the hills of the Finger Lakes region of central New York in early December. Shapes of the snow-covered hills are accented by the low Sun angles, and contrast with the darker, finger-shaped lakes filling the regionís valleys. The steep, roughly parallel valleys and hills of the Finger Lakes region were shaped by advancing and retreating ice sheets that were as much as 2 miles deep during the last ice age (2 million years to about 10,000 years ago). River valleys were scoured into deep troughs; many are now filled with lakes. The two largest lakes, Seneca and Cayuga, are so deep that the base of their lakebeds are below sea level.

The cities of Rochester, Syracuse, and Ithaca are included in this field-of-view, taken from the International Space Station. These three cities enjoy large seasonal snowpacks, thanks to the influence of the Great Lakes producing lake-effect snowstorms. Despite its reputation for long winters, the region is balmy compared with the glacial climate present when the landscape was carved. At the time of the greatest ice extent, yearly average temperatures over northern North America were several degrees lower than today.



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