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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

Astronaut Photography of Earth - Display Record

ISS008-E-11807

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS008-E-11807.JPG 42271540362 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS008-E-11807.JPG 54014639435 No No
View ISS008-E-11807.JPG 14913810001171 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web siteColor adjusted
View ISS008-E-11807.JPG 62545230322064 No No
View ISS008-E-11807.JPG 161498815481812 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web siteColor adjusted

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Electronic Image Data

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Identification

Mission: ISS008 Roll: E Frame: 11807 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS008
Country or Geographic Name: ARGENTINA
Features: UPSALA GLACIER, CLOUDS
Center Point: Latitude: -50.0 Longitude: -73.0 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: High Oblique
Camera Focal Length: 400mm
Camera: E4: Kodak DCS760C Electronic Still Camera
Film: 3060E : 3060 x 2036 pixel CCD, RGBG array.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 75 (51-75)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20040103 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 194401 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: -46.2, Longitude: -76.5 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: Southeast
Sun Azimuth: 294 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 202 nautical miles (374 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 51 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 1237

Captions

Glacial Retreat:
For the crew onboard the International Space Station daylight views of the Earth’s Southern Hemisphere offer fewer opportunities to observe and document land features with onboard cameras. However, South America’s Patagonian Ice Fields and glaciers in the far southern Andes mountains offer beautiful, dynamic features with frequent passes whenever weather conditions permit. On the afternoon of January 3, 2004, the crew took this view of the Upsala Glacier in Argentina through a 400mm lens. This is the third largest glacier of the Southern Patagonian Ice Field with an estimated area of over 800 square kilometers. This long, north-south oriented river of ice terminates in the northern arm of Lake Argentino.

A worldwide retreat of glaciers was observed during the twentieth century and most of the Patagonia’s glaciers, including Upsala were no exception. From the late 1960’s to the mid 1990’s the retreat of some parts was in excess of 4 kilometers. The glacier’s retreat appears to be continuing during the Space Station era with visible changes along the terminus noted when compared with ISS001-E-5318 taken in December 2000. The crew continues to monitor most of the principal glaciers of Patagonia as science targets for Crew Earth Observations.

For more information on the observed history of Patagonia’s glaciers please see: Historic Fluctuations of Outlet Glaciers from the Patagonian Ice Fields.

Previous views of the Patagonian Ice fields from the International Space Station:
Retreat of San Quentin Glacier
Northern Patagonian Ice Field
Bruggen Glacier

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