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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

Astronaut Photography of Earth - Display Record

ISS007-E-05697

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS007-E-5697.JPG 56978540405 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web siteColor adjusted
View ISS007-E-5697.JPG 56978540405 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS007-E-5697.JPG 80363639435 No No
View ISS007-E-5697.JPG 84651540352 Photographic Highlights(resized 540 px images)
View ISS007-E-5697.JPG 3259631000651 Photographic Highlights(actual files used)
View ISS007-E-5697.JPG 10645371000651 Yes
View ISS007-E-5697.JPG 118070530322064 No No NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS007-E-5697_2.JPG 558989961444068 No No PresentationEarth Sciences Results Briefing/Ed Lu

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Electronic Image Data

Camera Files >> No sound file available.

Identification

Mission: ISS007 Roll: E Frame: 5697 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS007
Country or Geographic Name: AUSTRALIA-NT
Features: GOSSES BLUFF IMPACT CRATER
Center Point: Latitude: -24.0 Longitude: 132.5 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: 30
Camera Focal Length: 180mm
Camera: E4: Kodak DCS760C Electronic Still Camera
Film: 3060E : 3060 x 2036 pixel CCD, RGBG array.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20030520 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 225637 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: -22.8, Longitude: 134.1 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: Southwest
Sun Azimuth: 59 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 211 nautical miles (391 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 17 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 1675

Captions

Impact craters, like those we observe on the moon, also occur on Earth. They result from the collisions of extraterrestrial bodies (like meteorites, asteroids or comets) with the Earth. Planetary scientists study Earth’s impact craters to gain insight about the early history of the Earth and the Solar System. Recent studies indicate that large impacts on Earth may have played an important role in the succession of life on Earth.

Australia is a very good place to observe and study impact craters. Much of the Australian surface is very old, so Australia has collected more impacts than many other parts of the world. Because of the dry climate, the craters haven’t weathered away, nor are they hidden by dense vegetation.

This image shows Gosses Bluff, an impact crater sandwiched between the Macdonnell Range to the north and the James Range to the south in Australia’s Northern Territory—it is about 160 km west of Alice Springs. It is one of the most studied of the Australian impact craters. The impactor, an asteroid or comet, was probably about 1 km in diameter and crashed into the earth about 142 million years ago. The isolated circular feature within the crater consists of a central ring of hills about 4.5 km in diameter. The grayish feature surrounding the inner ring probably marks the original boundary of the outer rim.

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