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Astronaut Photography of Earth - Display Record

ISS006-E-38306

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS006-E-38306.JPG 60756639435 No No
View ISS006-E-38306.JPG 244860540357 Yes Yes Earth From Space collection
View ISS006-E-38306.JPG 7395401000661 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS006-E-38306.JPG 105431130322064 No No

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Electronic Image Data

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Identification

Mission: ISS006 Roll: E Frame: 38306 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS006
Country or Geographic Name: PERU
Features: COASTLINE, ANDES RANGE
Center Point: Latitude: -15.5 Longitude: -74.0 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: High Oblique
Camera Focal Length: 180mm
Camera: E4: Kodak DCS760C Electronic Still Camera
Film: 3060E : 3060 x 2036 pixel CCD, RGBG array.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20030314 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 152310 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: -8.9, Longitude: -80.5 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: Southeast
Sun Azimuth: 81 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 215 nautical miles (398 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 58 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 625

Captions

Arid Coast of Peru

Following the last major upheaval of the Andes Mountains, rivers flowing down into the Pacific Ocean have carved dramatic canyons along Peru’s southern coast. In geologic terms, the canyons are relatively young—carved over the past 8 million years. This oblique (off-vertical) image from March 14, 2003, provides a southward look down Peru’s rugged, arid coastline between 15.5 and 17 degrees South latitude. The canyons run from left to right and appear grayer than the surrounding reddish-brown terrain.

The canyons found here are some of the deepest and steepest on Earth—lake Laguna Parincocha (top left corner) lies on the Andean plateau about 3,250 meters (10,700 feet) above sea level, about 80 kilometers (50 miles) from the coast. At lower left, a dense pattern of parallel grooves has been carved into a sheet of volcanic rock by now-dry streams. The volcanic rock is a kind called ignimbrite, which is the result of an eruption of hot gases and small rock fragments that flow from the volcano like a fluid (a pyroclastic flow). In an ignimbrite, the rock fragments are mostly pumice, a lightweight volcanic glass full of cavities.

The Yauca and Acarí rivers feed small, tan-colored sediment plumes into the sea (lower right). Dark green agricultural fields cluster along the lower courses of the rivers. Strong southerly winds have generated sand dunes and dark wind streaks along the coast, whose alignments re-curve inland into the lower river valleys (lower right). The coast and canyons are commonly hazy due to oceanic air and blowing dust. Yellow lines parallel with the coast and near the small peninsula are raised shorelines probably caused by tectonic uplift of the coastline.


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