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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

Astronaut Photography of Earth - Display Record

ISS006-E-18372

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS006-E-18372.JPG 27386516387 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS006-E-18372.JPG 56684639437 No No
View ISS006-E-18372.JPG 72906920001368 No No
View ISS006-E-18372.TIF 793223820001312 No No Original file from camera

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Electronic Image Data

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Identification

Mission: ISS006 Roll: E Frame: 18372 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS006
Country or Geographic Name: CANADA-Q
Features: AURORA BOREALIS, MANICOUAGAN RESERVOIR
Center Point: Latitude: 50.5 Longitude: -69.5 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: High Oblique
Camera Focal Length: 58mm
Camera: N1: Nikon D1
Film: 2000E : 2000 x 1312 pixel CCD, RGBG imager color filter.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 25 (11-25)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20030118 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 074040 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: 46.5, Longitude: -55.5 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction: West
Sun Azimuth: 81 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 206 nautical miles (382 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: -37 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 3762

Captions

What do auroras look like from space? From the ground, auroras dance high above clouds, frequently causing spectacular displays. The International Space Station (ISS) orbits just at the same height as many auroras, though. Therefore, sometimes it flies over them, but also sometimes it flies right through. The auroral electron and proton streams are too thin to be a danger to the ISS, just as clouds pose little danger to airplanes. ISS Science Officer Don Pettit captured a green aurora, pictured above in a digitally sharpened image. From orbit, Dr. Pettit reports, changing auroras can appear to crawl around like giant green amoebas. Far below, on planet Earth, the Manicouagan Impact Crater can be seen in northern Canada.

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