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Photographing the Earth from the International Space Station

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ISS005-E-21295

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File NameFile Size (bytes)WidthHeightAnnotatedCroppedPurposeComments
View ISS005-E-21295.JPG 104578639435 No No
View ISS005-E-21295.JPG 302769540346 Yes Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS005-E-21295.JPG 8567301000640 No Yes NASA's Earth Observatory web site
View ISS005-E-21295.JPG 198631430322064 No No

Electronic Image Data

Camera Files >> No sound file available.

Identification

Mission: ISS005 Roll: E Frame: 21295 Mission ID on the Film or image: ISS005
Country or Geographic Name: AUSTRALIA
Features: LINEAR DUNES, FIRE SCARS
Center Point: Latitude: Longitude: (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)
Stereo: (Yes indicates there is an adjacent picture of the same area)
ONC Map ID: JNC Map ID:

Camera

Camera Tilt: Low Oblique
Camera Focal Length: 800mm
Camera: E4: Kodak DCS760C Electronic Still Camera
Film: 3060E : 3060 x 2036 pixel CCD, RGBG array.

Quality

Film Exposure:
Percentage of Cloud Cover: 10 (0-10)

Nadir

GMT Date: 20021123 (YYYYMMDD) GMT Time: 221119 (HHMMSS)
Nadir Point Latitude: -24.6, Longitude: 136.5 (Negative numbers indicate south for latitude and west for longitude)

Nadir to Photo Center Direction:
Sun Azimuth: 101 (Clockwise angle in degrees from north to the sun measured at the nadir point)
Spacecraft Altitude: 208 nautical miles (385 km)
Sun Elevation Angle: 28 (Angle in degrees between the horizon and the sun, measured at the nadir point)
Orbit Number: 2898

Captions

Fire Scars in Australia's Simpson Desert

Bright orange fire scars show up the underlying dune sand in the Simpson Desert, 300 kilometers east of Alice Springs. The background is an intricate pattern of sand cordons that angle across the view from lower left to upper right. These cordons are now mostly green, showing that, although they were once shifting, they have become more or less static—“tied down” by a vegetation mat of desert scrub.

The fire scars were produced in a recent fire, probably within the last year. The image suggests a time sequence of events. Fires first advanced into the view from the lower left—parallel with the major dune trend and dominant wind direction. Then the wind shifted direction by about 90 degrees so that fires advanced across the dunes in a series of frond-like tendrils. Each frond starts at some point on the earlier fire scar, and sharp tips of the fronds show where the fires burned out naturally at the end of the episode. The sharp edges of the fire scars are due to steady but probably weak southwesterly winds—weaker winds reduced sparking of additional fires in adjacent scrub on either side of the main fire pathways. Over time, the scars will become less distinct as vegetation grows back.


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