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Crew Earth Observations Video Page

This clickable map organizes all of the existing time-lapse sequences into geographical regions. These videos are organized to both aid in searching for a desired area of the Earth, and to break down the volume of the existing time-lapse sequences. Each region below is separated by regions around the world, as well as links below the clickable map to the "Aurora Borealis and Australis" and "Special Videos". The newest release of time-lapse sequences will be posted just below these two sections.

Click an area to explore videos
Explore Africa videos Explore Eastern Europe videos Explore Northeast Asia videos Explore North America videos Explore Pacific ocean videos Explore Pacific ocean videos Explore Pacific ocean videos Explore Southeast Asia videos Explore South America videos Explore South Pacific videos Explore Western Europe videos Explore Indian ocean videos

Latest videos from the crew

Over Asia at Night

This video was taken by the Expedition 46 crew on board the International Space Station. The sequence of shots was taken on January 10, 2016 from 17:23:308 to 17:41:18 GMT, on a pass over East Asia at night. The time lapse begins with the ISS traveling northeast passing over several visible lightning storms occurring over the Indonesian island of Java. Next, ISS continues traveling northeast over Java to mainland Indonesia, passing over the Philippines and its capital city Manila before ending the pass over the Pacific Ocean with the Japanese city Tokyo visible to the west.



Date posted: 2016/05/11
Compiled from frames ISS046-E-7309 to ISS046-E-7854

Sunglint over the Ocean

This video was taken by the Expedition 47 crew on board the International Space Station. The sequence of shots was taken on March 25, 2016 from 11:45:02 to 11:57:17 GMT on a pass over the ocean with very dense cloud cover. As the ISS continues traveling, the video shows a stunning view of sun glint over the ocean. Sunglint occurs when sunlight reflects off the surface of the ocean at the same angle that a satellite or other sensor is viewing the surface. The sun glint causes the ocean’s surface to look smooth, almost like glass.



Date posted: 2016/05/02
Compiled from frames ISS047-E-18857 to ISS047-E-19592